Shine a Light: Milbrook Marsh Illuminated

Shine a Light: Milbrook Marsh Illuminated

Site specific installation and drawing in collaboration with Ann Tarantino.

2014

Shine a Light (detail)

Shine a Light (detail)

Shine a Light (detail)

Shine a Light (detail)

2014

Shine a Light (detail)

Shine a Light (detail)

E.V.E.: Erectus Vegetabilis Evitaneus

E.V.E.: Erectus Vegetabilis Evitaneus

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

2013

INCARNATE: Bunker Projects Residency

INCARNATE: Bunker Projects Residency

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

2013

(Detail)

(Detail)

Meaingless Imitations of Writing Installation

Meaingless Imitations of Writing Installation

Installation. Acrylic and Ink on Vellum. 2012

Meaningless Imitations of Writing Installation

Meaningless Imitations of Writing Installation

(Detail)

(Detail)

2012

(Detail)

(Detail)

2012

Shine a Light: Milbrook Marsh Illuminated thumbnail
Shine a Light (detail) thumbnail
Shine a Light (detail) thumbnail
Shine a Light (detail) thumbnail
E.V.E.: Erectus Vegetabilis Evitaneus  thumbnail
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INCARNATE: Bunker Projects Residency  thumbnail
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Meaingless Imitations of Writing Installation thumbnail
Meaningless Imitations of Writing Installation thumbnail
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‘Meaningless Imitations of Writing’ was inspired by the intricate designs and patterns that have decorated the architecture, textiles, and objects of almost every culture. With the help of Biological Anthropologist Anne Buchannan, and Art Historian Sarah Rich, I developed a wallpaper pattern out of a small sequence of mRNA. This small sequence is part of the cell adhesion molecule, L1CAM, found in the corpus callosum. Joining the two hemispheres of the brain, the corpus callosum is a vital intersection for the creative process. Our brains use both hemispheres when forming new ideas, regardless of if they are based in science or art making.

When developing a series of symbols to signify the four bases, I divided the Prymidines and Purines and based their symbols on natural versus man-made forms. One group resembles symbols for biohazards and warnings, and the other more amicable forms such as flowering plants. In the process of transcribing the pattern of symbols, I chose to mimic calligraphic handwriting, allowing the gesture of language in the pattern to intertwine into its own form and structure. The rich heritage and history of patterning contains both direct and subtle references to the human body and branching patterns. Decoration, ornamentation, and their language can be lost in the process of transcription over time, just as the information in the wallpaper pattern is lost to the uninformed viewer.